search instagram arrow-down
Pam Martin & John Kernaghan

Instagram

Winter nights in small town northern Ontario have a distinct feel with their wide, snow covered main streets devoid of traffic either foot or vehicle. Wawa, home of the famous Wawa Goose monument lights up its downtown with a tribute to the famous Wawa Goose that has attracted visitors since 1963 🦆
*
*
*
@wawa @wawatourism @ontariotravel @discoverontario @destinationnorthernontario @canamrv @mercedesbenzvansca #smalltowncharm #northernontario #rollydooley #roadtrip #roadtripcanada @bluejellyfishsup @fitforanythingadventures ...the big lake they called Gitche Gumee 🎶 *
*
*
#lakesuperior #greatlakes #canadaroadtrip #rollydooley #roadtrip @discoverontario THE NEXT CHAPTER BEGINS 🚐💨
*
*
*
Steering our new pal, Rolly Dooley across country on a wintery roadtrip to Vancouver Island ❄️
*
*
*
#roadtripcanada #rollydooley #mercedessprinter #thegreattrail #vanlife @bluejellyfishsup #rollinrollinrollin #keepthemdogiesrollin @fitforanythingadventures @canamrv @mercedesbenzvansca The rain didn't stop Pam from her yoga routine on the Brudenell River in PEI during Canada Onboard's Canada 150 celebration. Wind and fog issues on Charlottetown Harbour meant a diversion to the broad Brudenell, whose placid surface was perfect for downward dogs 🧘‍♀️⠀
*⠀
*⠀
*⠀
@tourismpei @explorecanada @peinationalpark @women_who_paddle @bluejellyfishsup @fitforanythingadventures #roadtrip #crosscanadapaddlingroadtrip #explorecanada #explorepei #adventure #sup #supcanada #standuppaddleyoga #downwarddog #makingthebestoftherain ⠀
We showed the flag right across Canada during our 150 birthday celebration, holding it tight here on a blustery September day on PEI. Weather and time limited us to a single paddle on an island which boasts plenty of on-water options🇨🇦⠀
*⠀
*⠀
*⠀
@tourismpei @explorecanada @PEInationalpark @bluejellyfishsup @fitforanythingadventures #roadtrip #crosscanadapaddlingroadtrip #ExplorePEI #explorecanada #adventure We’ve been away from posting on social media for a while but we haven’t stopped paddling or travelling. We’re kicking things off right back where we left you on the beautiful east coast of Canada. Follow along for the ride on our crazy cross Canada road trip and check out the link to our blog in our bio if you like spoiler alerts 🇨🇦
*
*
*
What an incredible find! As we crossed Canada we were looking up lodging on the fly. Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia was on our radar but the Train Station Inn popped up late in the day and we booked a railcar accommodation that was roomy and comfortable at a reasonable rate. And of course it perfectly fit our Canada Onboard project. Kudos to Jimmy LeFresne, who bought the station as a teenager to prevent its demolition, then began adding railcars as accommodation 🚂
*
*
*
@visitnovascotia @explorecanada @bluejellyfishsup @fitforanythingadventures @canadaonboard @trainstationinn #visitnovascotia #explorecanada #roadtrip #crazycrosscanadapaddlingroadtrip #keepexploring #tatamagouche #trainstation #northumberlandshore #trainstationinn

Follow Canada Onboard via Email

Enter your email address to follow Canada Onboard and receive notifications of new posts by email.

ARCHIVES

RECENT POSTS

There’s nothing quite like the shock of 16C water to clear the head of the fogginess wrought by a Newfoundland kitchen party.

View of Gros Morne National Park from the water.

Views from Neddies Harbour, a “tickle between two arms.”

The sudden dunking in Bonne Bay at Norris Point was a brutal first lesson in weight shifting on a standup paddleboard. One moment John was enjoying unusually balmy conditions and a 360-degree panorama of mountains, the next he was tasting salt water.

DSC_9392

This pristine location close to Gros Morne National Park was the first of at least 20 paddling adventures we will take on over 30 days during our Canada 150 celebration as Canadaonboard, a tribute to our nation and its’ waters.

Waving the flag, Newfoundland!

Waving the flag in glorious Norris Point, Newfoundland.

Arriving at Gros Morne National Park.

Arriving at Gros Morne National Park.

After the swim! He survived, ego slightly bruised but spirits still high.

John’s pratfall, his first after a handful of successful paddles, came just as a group of kayakers pulled close to us. Pam, a SUP instructor and guide, expertly braced the two boards together so John could scramble back on board and try to regain his dignity.

We explained our mission, the blogs and eventual story for The Canadian Press, and one of the group recognized John. “The Spectator, right?” he said, a reference to John’s time at The Hamilton Spectator.

 

The Land

Shag Cliff, Norris Point , Newfoundland

The stunning geology of Gros Morne National Park.

You have to get right back on the horse, so minutes later John was on his feet and enjoying the rugged setting that included the Shag Cliff, a formidable face of limestone that gleamed in the sun. It was a section of seabed thrust upward back in the mists of time by continental plates colliding. Later, glaciers gouged out the Gros Morne fiords.
It was one of several paddles recommended by the helpful folks at Gros Morne Adventures, who operate small-group kayaking, hiking and backpacking adventures in the park.

By Land or Sea – Unforgettable Vistas

Pam taking in the breathtaking vistas of Gros Morne National Park.Pam didn't want to get off the water!John looking strong as we take in the magnificent views of Gros Morne National Park. Loving these Cascadia inflatables.We couldn't get enough of these vistas. Sheltered waters, views of the Tablelands, and sun kissed rock edges as well as the freshest of air.A gentle ride home on the current allowed us to breath in the fresh air & soak in the views.

 

A Must-Do in Newfoundland!

 

The weather was as welcoming as the local folks, who cheered on visitors the night before at The Anchor Pub in the Oceanview Hotel in Rocky Harbour.

 

A night of Newfie music and humour and a dance called The Stomp climaxed with the screeching-in ceremony that included a vow to return to the Rock, a shot of rum screech and a kiss of a frozen cod named Sophie. It was only fitting that a restorative baptism in cold water the next morning would follow.

Neddies Harbour Inn

An early evening walk through town highlights Neddies Harbour Inn.

An early evening walk through town highlights Neddies Harbour Inn.

View from the grounds of Neddies Harbour Inn.

Wild roses, private yachts & a cheerful inn enjoy the stunning landscapes.

Neddies Harbour Inn provides a perfect launch for paddlers.

Neddies Harbour Inn provides a perfect launch for paddlers.

Needles Harbour Inn

Seriously, can’t wait to get back here!

We enjoyed the convenience of putting into the water right behind our hotel, Neddies Harbour Inn, sliding the sturdy Cascadia inflatable SUPs off the top of our SUV in the classic setting of a fishing port. Lobster traps, nets and rope were the backdrop to our launch.

Launching behind Neddies Harbour Inn.

Launching right into Gros Morne National Park.

The Inn is a simply striking accommodation, recently refurbished with touches of elegance and affording brilliant views of the water, the mountains and tablelands of Gros Morne embracing Bonne Bay.

Local Gastronomy

The Black Spruce Restaurant.

Neddies Harbour Inn & The Black Spruce Restaurant

We enjoyed cod in an infinitely nicer context the night before with the panfried filet at the Inn’s sunny restaurant, The Black Spruce, where award-winning chef Jason Lynch hangs his toque blanche. It was a delicate rendition of the island staple delivered with a flurry of “my loves” and “my darlin’s” that attend Newfoundland service.

The Old Store Café is a delightful surprise, a cheery little eatery with great coffee, baked goods, and soups and salads. The setting is unstuffy with colourful local art on the walls. It is a former general store for the area and our server pointed out the corner where he used to ponder the candy jars. The breakfast sandwich and couscous salad were delicious.

 

 

 

Meet the Locals – Science Collaboration

The sea and its creatures are never far away here but rarely as close as you can get to them at the Bonne Bay Marine Station right at the Point’s tip.

 

 

It’s operated by Memorial University and is home to ongoing research as well as displays open to the public explaining the staggering range of diversity of marine plant life, fish and invertebrates in the area. The in-your-face encounters with snow crabs and rare blue lobsters are a highlight.

Combined with the soaring and twisting drive to and from Gros Morne, an epiphany of land and sea, it was a remarkable first leg of our journey.

Sunset from Bonne Bay, looking towards the Gros Morne Tablelands.

Sunset over Bonne Bay, looking towards the Gros Morne Tablelands.

 

Around & About Norris Point, Newfoundland

A water way of life in Norris Point, Newfoundland.

A water way of life in Norris Point, Newfoundland.

An early evening stroll in Norris Point, Newfoundland

An early evening stroll through Norris Point, Newfoundland.

Car rental in Norris Point, Newfoundland.

Car rental in Norris Point, Newfoundland.

The colours & textures of life in Norris Point, Newfoundland.

The colours & textures of life in Norris Point, Newfoundland.

Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse, Newfoundland.

Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse, near Rocky Harbour, Newfoundland.

 

Gros Morne - Needs some help!

Grow Morne National Park – Needs some help!

Sunset in Port aux Basques, Newfoundland

Sunset in Port aux Basques, Newfoundland.

 

3 comments on “Screeched-in & Baptized On The Rock

  1. Nurtured in newfi

    1. Are you from Newfoundland Sharon?

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: